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  1. LGS Innovations named as finalist for Northern Virginia Chamber 2017 Greater Washington Government Contractor Awards™,

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    The Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce (Northern Virginia Chamber) and the Professional Services Council (PSC) have announced finalists for the 15th Annual Greater Washington Government Contractor Awards™, the premier awards event for the Washington area government contracting community.  The winners of the most prestigious awards in the industry will be named at a Nov. 1 gala at The Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner.

    LGS Innovations is proud to be named a finalist for Contractor of the Year in 2017. For more information please visit http://bit.ly/2flOk9w 

  1. DARPA Wants to MacGyver the Internet Using Only What’s in Troops’ Pockets,

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    Via Nextgov
    September 11, 2017

    Modern technology is helping soldiers push to the limits of their physical capabilities on the battlefield, but advancements in communication and assimilation of data still rely on a 1990s-era legacy premise: a networked connection to a military data center.

    Today’s battlefields require significant information processing capabilities, such as the sending of images, videos and sensor data, yet extensive data processing and exchange relies on dependable network connections and bandwidth capabilities that don’t always exist.

    This is a problem the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—the Defense Department’s research arm—has grappled with for years, but recent contract awards through its dispersed computing (DCOMP) program may be the first steps the U.S. military takes toward mitigating this problem.

    Specifically, according to program manager Steve Jameson, DARPA “seeks to design systems able to operate in environments where network connectivity is highly variable and degraded. The envisioned computing paradigm aims to enable the strategic, opportunistic movement of code to data, and data to code, in a fashion that best suits user, application, and mission needs.”

    Kevin Kelly, chief executive officer of LGS Innovations, offered Nextgovan outline of this theoretical technology might look like in action. LGS Innovations was recently awarded a four-year, $7.5 million contract by DARPA as part of the DCOMP program’s first phase. Three other companies, Raytheon BBN, BAE and Vencore Labs, were awarded similar contracts addressing other aspects of the program.

    “What if on the battlefield we use the information, memory and compute power available on everybody’s devices in a localized environment and in a localized manner? That’s what dispersed computing is all about,” Kelly said.

    The example can be applied to the average retail consumer, who may have a laptop, smartphone, tablet or even web-connected vehicle. Those devices can share information among them, but they do so through centralized internet connections. If a user wants to transfer a photo from one device to another, he or she would move them through cloud-based photo library.

    A dispersed computing environment, Kelly said, would allow the seamless exchange of data, memory or computing horsepower among those devices without the need for a centralized connection.

    “Why can’t my laptop get pictures off my phone without going through the internet? The reality is that it can, but it is not programmed to do that. The user authentication, validation of data—all that happens in the cloud,” Kelly said. He said dispersed computing “pushes functionality as close to the edge as possible” away from a centralized environment.

    Modern warfighters, like their consumer counterparts, have radios, locators, smartphones, sensors and other devices with computing and storage capabilities that, with the proper architecture and algorithms, could pool those algorithms together. The higher the number of warfighters and networked computing devices, the stronger the dispersed computing system’s capabilities.

    “What if instead of going to the cloud, the cloud was all around you?” Kelly said.

    If it sounds simple in theory, Kelly said it will be far more complex to put into practice.

    The first big hurdle will be the “networking challenge,” he said. Concepts like latency, the practicalities of electron flow and other physics dilemmas boil down to complex mathematical issues.

    “Right now, it’s a big math problem,” Kelly said.

    Should the math problem prove solvable, the next stage of dispersed computing’s evolution will be establishing architectures and protocols.

    FULL STORY

  1. DARPA Wants to MacGyver the Internet Using Only What’s in Troops’ Pockets,

    Share:

    Via Nextgov
    September 11, 2017

    Modern technology is helping soldiers push to the limits of their physical capabilities on the battlefield, but advancements in communication and assimilation of data still rely on a 1990s-era legacy premise: a networked connection to a military data center.

    Today’s battlefields require significant information processing capabilities, such as the sending of images, videos and sensor data, yet extensive data processing and exchange relies on dependable network connections and bandwidth capabilities that don’t always exist.

    This is a problem the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency—the Defense Department’s research arm—has grappled with for years, but recent contract awards through its dispersed computing (DCOMP) program may be the first steps the U.S. military takes toward mitigating this problem.

    Specifically, according to program manager Steve Jameson, DARPA “seeks to design systems able to operate in environments where network connectivity is highly variable and degraded. The envisioned computing paradigm aims to enable the strategic, opportunistic movement of code to data, and data to code, in a fashion that best suits user, application, and mission needs.”

    Kevin Kelly, chief executive officer of LGS Innovations, offered Nextgovan outline of this theoretical technology might look like in action. LGS Innovations was recently awarded a four-year, $7.5 million contract by DARPA as part of the DCOMP program’s first phase. Three other companies, Raytheon BBN, BAE and Vencore Labs, were awarded similar contracts addressing other aspects of the program.

    “What if on the battlefield we use the information, memory and compute power available on everybody’s devices in a localized environment and in a localized manner? That’s what dispersed computing is all about,” Kelly said.

    The example can be applied to the average retail consumer, who may have a laptop, smartphone, tablet or even web-connected vehicle. Those devices can share information among them, but they do so through centralized internet connections. If a user wants to transfer a photo from one device to another, he or she would move them through cloud-based photo library.

    A dispersed computing environment, Kelly said, would allow the seamless exchange of data, memory or computing horsepower among those devices without the need for a centralized connection.

    “Why can’t my laptop get pictures off my phone without going through the internet? The reality is that it can, but it is not programmed to do that. The user authentication, validation of data—all that happens in the cloud,” Kelly said. He said dispersed computing “pushes functionality as close to the edge as possible” away from a centralized environment.

    Modern warfighters, like their consumer counterparts, have radios, locators, smartphones, sensors and other devices with computing and storage capabilities that, with the proper architecture and algorithms, could pool those algorithms together. The higher the number of warfighters and networked computing devices, the stronger the dispersed computing system’s capabilities.

    “What if instead of going to the cloud, the cloud was all around you?” Kelly said.

    If it sounds simple in theory, Kelly said it will be far more complex to put into practice.

    The first big hurdle will be the “networking challenge,” he said. Concepts like latency, the practicalities of electron flow and other physics dilemmas boil down to complex mathematical issues.

    “Right now, it’s a big math problem,” Kelly said.

    Should the math problem prove solvable, the next stage of dispersed computing’s evolution will be establishing architectures and protocols.

    FULL STORY

  2. LGS Group President Ray Ivie Talks About Increasingly Challenging Environments with Global Military Communications Magazine,

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    Ray Ivie, Group President of Integration and Operations Solutions for LGS Innovations, had a recent discussion with Global Military Communications about the increasing challenges in the C4ISR and Cyber mission spaces. “Our goal is to give our warfighters and decision makers an ‘unfair advantage’ over threats and adversaries, and we do so daily.”

    Check out the full story here.

  3. Free-space optical could help address spectrum crunch,

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    Via FierceWireless
    http://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/free-space-optical-could-help-address-spectrum-crunch?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss

    The commercial optical fiber market is a large one compared to the free-space optical market, but the folks at LGS Innovations, a former subsidiary of Alcatel-Lucent, see that changing.

    “We’re seeing a lot more interest in commercial free-space optical communications now than we did a few years ago,” Tom Wood, technical director of New Business Development at LGS Innovations, told FierceWirelessTech.

    The company has been working in the optical communications and technologies space for more than 20 years, mostly related to government work. Now, the commercial sector is coming around.

    Optical fiber requires a physical flexible cable that connects two ends of the link, whereas free-space optical technology is basically doing the same thing but sending signals through the air. The frequency band used for free-space optical communication is roughly 193 terahertz.

    In fact, anybody who’s building a next-generation satellite constellation might want to take a look at optical communications. The folks at LGS are seeing a lot of interest in using free-space optical communication to communicate between satellites and between the ground and satellites. LGS engineers, builds and deploys free-space optical systems used to communicate between satellites and between satellites and their respective ground stations.

    In the commercial satellite communications market today, everybody needs spectrum, but it’s congested and there’s a lot of competition for the airwaves. With free-space spectrum, there are fewer limitations and it’s unlicensed, according to LGS representatives who spoke to FierceWirelessTech. In addition, the size, weight and power of the optical terminals can be much smaller than for a comparable RF terminal, and that’s true for both the spacecraft and stations on the ground.

    Plus with everybody uploading video and other content to social media sites, capacity becomes more of an issue. “These free-space optical communications systems can support the kind of bandwidth that users are coming to expect,” Wood said.

    Jay Moorman, group president of wireless solutions at LGS, said the crowded nature of spectrum is driving alternative solutions, with free-space optics being one of them. It’s also an attractive solution for remote areas where it’s challenging to deploy terrestrial gear.

    As for its ability to offer “five 9s” reliability, Wood said that free-space optics doesn’t do well going through clouds and rain, but with multiple ground stations strategically placed, it can provide high reliability. “As far as communications in space, five 9s reliability for this is quite achievable,” he said.

    Moorman agreed, adding that it’s not likely that anyone is going to take free-space optics and use it as a replacement for ground-based terrestrial systems anytime soon, but as they push the science, that is more likely to become an achievable goal. “I don’t see it happening in the short term,” he said. “We’re still a little bit a ways from that.”

Recent News
& Press Releases

The Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce (Northern Virginia Chamber) and the Professional Services Council (PSC) have announced finalists for the 15th Annual Greater Washington ...More

Via Nextgov September 11, 2017 Modern technology is helping soldiers push to the limits of their physical capabilities on the battlefield, but ...More

Ray Ivie, Group President of Integration and Operations Solutions for LGS Innovations, had a recent discussion with Global Military Communications ...More

Via FierceWireless http://www.fiercewireless.com/wireless/free-space-optical-could-help-address-spectrum-crunch?utm_source=internal&utm_medium=rss The commercial optical fiber market is a large one compared to the free-space optical market, but the ...More

One of LGS Innovations’ largest contracts is with the U.S. Army, in support of the Eighth Army headquarters’ historic move ...More

R&D program seeks to develop decision algorithms to efficiently allocate computing resources while improving network performance for defense missions by ...More

LGS Innovations is proud to have made the 2017 Defense News Top 100 list. For the full listing, see: http://people.defensenews.com/top-100/ ...More

On June 9, 2017, LGS Innovations CEO Kevin Kelly had the honor of remarking on the distinguished life and career ...More

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