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  1. Solving the Science Problems that Keep the IC Awake,

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    WashingtonExec
    March 22, 2017

    There is no better way to get new, game-changing ideas than by simply asking for them—and that is just what the Intelligence and National Security Alliance and the Science and Technology directorate at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence have done. In May, INSA will host its 10th Innovators’ Showcase, where researchers and developers can show the government their work to solve some of today’s biggest science and technology challenges.

    Kevin Kelly, CEO at LGS Innovations and one of the founding members of INSA’s Innovation and Technology council, said the showcase was originally modeled after an annual event held by Bell Labs, of which LGS Innovations is the remaining vestige of the federal portion of the labs.

    “Bell Labs used to have 200-250 concurrent research projects,” he said. “Researchers used to say, ‘Well, I wish I knew what everybody else was doing so I could increase collaboration and avoid reinventing the wheel.’ So Bell Labs’ Research Summit was an opportunity to get everyone on the same page.”

    CLICK HERE for the full story

  1. LGS sponsors 4th annual K-12 STEM Symposium,

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    As a pioneering leader in the application of new science and technological solutions, LGS Innovations understands the vital need to link today’s STEM classroom curricula to impactful careers. We promote STEM education programs in many ways, including scholarships, paid internships, and financial support for employees engaged in volunteer STEM programs in their communities.

    LGS Innovations is proud to be the Presenting Sponsor at the fourth annual K-12 STEM Symposium hosted by WashingtonExec at the NySmith School for the Gifted in Herndon, Virginia, on Saturday, March 25. The K-12 STEM Symposium is a free, exciting, interactive forum that engages children, parents, teachers, and representatives from corporate, government, academia, and nonprofit organizations who have a vested interest in the Washington D.C.-area STEM pipeline.

    At this year’s Symposium, elementary, middle, and high school students will learn about computer and robotics programming, 3D printing, drones, connected cars, healthcare, and other topics through a wide range of fun and interactive exhibitors and speakers.

    In addition to serving as the lead sponsor of this year’s STEM Symposium, LGS speakers will address topics including STEM Workforce Needs and Solutions, Opportunities in STEM, and more alongside fighter pilots, astronauts, and politicians. Our scientists and program managers will also present a series of interactive demonstrations including breaking wine glasses, virtual reality, fun with liquid nitrogen, and many others across the fields of sound/radio waves, video, and robotics.

    “We’re excited and honored to be the lead sponsor of this year’s K-12 STEM Symposium,” says LGS CEO Kevin Kelly. “When it comes to ensuring our nation’s continued leadership in science and engineering, it takes a village—and it starts early. We’re proud to support STEM initiatives here in the D.C. area and in other communities where LGS offices are located across the country.”

    The K-12 STEM Symposium will run from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 25, at the NySmith School in Herndon—register now!

     

  1. LGS sponsors 4th annual K-12 STEM Symposium,

    Share:

    As a pioneering leader in the application of new science and technological solutions, LGS Innovations understands the vital need to link today’s STEM classroom curricula to impactful careers. We promote STEM education programs in many ways, including scholarships, paid internships, and financial support for employees engaged in volunteer STEM programs in their communities.

    LGS Innovations is proud to be the Presenting Sponsor at the fourth annual K-12 STEM Symposium hosted by WashingtonExec at the NySmith School for the Gifted in Herndon, Virginia, on Saturday, March 25. The K-12 STEM Symposium is a free, exciting, interactive forum that engages children, parents, teachers, and representatives from corporate, government, academia, and nonprofit organizations who have a vested interest in the Washington D.C.-area STEM pipeline.

    At this year’s Symposium, elementary, middle, and high school students will learn about computer and robotics programming, 3D printing, drones, connected cars, healthcare, and other topics through a wide range of fun and interactive exhibitors and speakers.

    In addition to serving as the lead sponsor of this year’s STEM Symposium, LGS speakers will address topics including STEM Workforce Needs and Solutions, Opportunities in STEM, and more alongside fighter pilots, astronauts, and politicians. Our scientists and program managers will also present a series of interactive demonstrations including breaking wine glasses, virtual reality, fun with liquid nitrogen, and many others across the fields of sound/radio waves, video, and robotics.

    “We’re excited and honored to be the lead sponsor of this year’s K-12 STEM Symposium,” says LGS CEO Kevin Kelly. “When it comes to ensuring our nation’s continued leadership in science and engineering, it takes a village—and it starts early. We’re proud to support STEM initiatives here in the D.C. area and in other communities where LGS offices are located across the country.”

    The K-12 STEM Symposium will run from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, March 25, at the NySmith School in Herndon—register now!

     

  2. Security Concerns Rising in the Age of IoT,

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    Experts call for uniform standards to reduce the vulnerabilities of smart technology.

    The Internet of Things has gone mainstream. Home refrigerators are chattier than ever, and emerging virtual home assistants can order wings for dinner, turn on lawn sprinklers, start the car and purchase pounds of cookies—all without users ever rising from the couch. Yet behind the headlines of these gee-whiz cyber technologies lurks a shortcoming. It is one that poses significant threats to national security but could be remedied fairly easily, some experts offer.

    The mobile device and sensor industries lack uniform security standards and a system of checks and balances—something akin to the safety standards for electrical devices and components offered by the global safety consulting and certification company UL, formerly Underwriters Laboratories.

    “You can’t sell a blender at Macy’s without it having the Underwriters Laboratories stamp on it,” signals Kevin Kelly, CEO of LGS Innovations, which researches, develops and deploys networking and communications solutions for government and commercial organizations. “They’ve published standards that say, in order for this to be considered safe, you [the] manufacturer must meet the following standards, and you must have your own internal inspection team that tests these devices. 

    “The same does not apply for Internet-connected devices. It’s really left the door wide open for bad actors, bad practice and people being careless with developing devices.”

    The U.S. government has taken note, acknowledging the benefits of Internet of Things (IoT) systems and services as well as the drawbacks. “IoT security, however, has not kept up with the rapid pace of innovation and deployment, creating substantial safety and economic risks,” reads a document from the Department of Homeland Security explaining risks and suggesting best practices.

    Read more at SIGNAL Magazine: http://www.afcea.org/content/?q=Article-security-concerns-rising-age-iot

  3. Riding the mmWave to 5G,

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    One of the main goals for the next generation in wireless mobile communications, or 5G, is to maximize capacity. Not only will we continue to see ongoing improvement in data connection rates, but also new advances in making the most of finite spectrum resources. Given the exponential increases in demand for spectrum, 5G presents more challenges than simply relying on Moore’s Law-like growth to magically increase the download speeds of our video-streaming services.

    In addition to serving growing numbers of mobile users, 5G must also accommodate a tsunami of connected, low-power, Internet of Things (IoT) devices, while maintaining network reliability, improving security, and keeping network costs under control. Leveraging 5G benefits will require a series of tradeoff decisions to balance the needs of mission-critical applications such as healthcare, defense, and self-driving cars with these ever-increasing demands for network capacity.

    To fully leverage 5G, we’ll have to do more with existing spectrum under 6 GHz and attack the technical challenges associated with newly-available high frequency spectrum over 6 GHz, also called millimeter-wave, or mmWave. This spectrum offers tantalizing large swaths of bandwidth, but taking advantage of it will require new approaches.

    Millimeter-wave communications are currently used for the fixed links between cell towers, called backhaul. These systems often have fixed antenna dishes pointing at each other and are highly regulated to avoid interference between links. Dishes don’t make sense in a 5G world, where everyone is on the go and antennas need to be tiny so they can be integrated into mobile phones and other gadgets.

    Technologies which were recently only relevant to military applications will need to be leveraged to make mmWave useful for everyday mobile users. These new approaches to maximizing available spectrum include digital beamforming to electronically steer communication beams and space-time-adaptive processing (STAP) to overcome challenging RF channel conditions. As existing LTE cellular bands continue to mature, dynamic band balancing and integration with legacy infrastructure will be essential.

    While it hasn’t yet seen wide commercial adoption, the latest 802.11ad WiGig style of Wi-Fi already operates in the 60 GHz mmWave band. It embodies new advances required by 5G, such as digital beam-steering, and it provides a good technical foundation and starting point for meeting some aspects of the 5G standard.

    There is also much more that could be leveraged by creating more intelligent and predictive networking software. Pushing analytics and learning algorithms into the cellular network will help to maximize the benefits and utility of 5G. These kinds of technological advances, built on existing solutions and expertise in RF networking, phased-array antennas, signal processing, and advanced software capabilities, will be necessary to achieve the desired benefits of 5G networks.

    “At LGS Innovations, our investment in 5G wireless technologies goes well beyond simple academic interest,” says Marc Beacken, VP of Technical R&D for the LGS Advanced Multimedia, Networking & Communications (AMNC) team. “We create 5G-relevant technology and solutions that span the breadth of wireless communications, including state-of-the-art cellular networks and protocols, with application to both DoD and commercial markets.”

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